Partner Starter Institute

This how-to is for arts education organizations and for teaching artists who are new to working with Chicago Public Schools. How can arts partners build collaborative relationships with schools? How can schools and arts partners develop a shared language? What are current CPS priorities?

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on the fundamentals of working with CPS at both the district and school levels through the lens of the CPS Arts Education Plan and the Creative Schools Initiative
  • Tools for a supportive partnership and fluency of CPS goals and priorities
  • Insights from veteran community arts partners and CPS leaders

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff and teaching artists with less than two years of experience working with CPS, and individuals who are new to arts education work should attend.

Schedule
This program will be offered once:
Friday, August 4, 2017 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Logan Center, 9th floor, 915 E. 60th St.
Lunch is provided

Register
http://bit.ly/PartnerStarter


Creative Schools Fund Information Session

This session will introduce arts partner organizations to the Creative Schools Fund principles, goals, and eligibility criteria, as well as cover expectations for organizations that partner with grantee schools.

This training will provide the following:

  • Introduction to the Creative Schools Fund
  • Tools for subcontracting partners
  • Insights from a panel of previous recipients and their partners

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, teaching artists, and anyone who intends on subcontracting with school recipients of Creative Schools Fund grants and awards should attend.

Schedule
This training will be offered once:
Monday, June 26, 2017 10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Looking Glass Theatre, 821 N. Michigan Ave.

Presenters
Elizabeth Cole, director of the Creative Schools Fund
Panelists (Creative Schools Award and Arts Advance Grant subcontractors from 2016–2017)

Register
http://bit.ly/PartnersCSF


Planning for Quality 101: Program Design, Objective Mapping, and Logic Models

Arts partners grapple with many different kinds of learning objectives and outcomes including social emotional learning, social justice, non-arts curricular objectives, and arts skills and processes. Planning for Quality 101 will introduce logic models and provide insights into their bene ts for planning, implementing, and evaluating programs.

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on aims, goals, and objectives mapping and the roles they play in the construction of logic models
  • Tools for program evaluation based on a logic model
  • Insights into identifying the areas of importance to the mission and vision of the organization; therefore, enabling the development of high-quality goals that can be clearly communicated and produce meaningful outcomes

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Prerequisite learning
This institute is the first in a series of six. No prerequisite is required.

Presenters
Douglas G. Boughton, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University
Kerry Freedman, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University

Schedule
This program will be offered twice:
Friday, October 27, 2017  9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Friday, March 30, 2018 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Register
October: http://bit.ly/101_Oct
March: http://bit.ly/101_March


Planning for Quality 102: Standards and/or Goal Development and Assessment

Planning for Quality 102 will focus on arts standards and goals that guide program development and assessment in schools. Participants will identify relevant standards and discuss the way they in uence the design of goals, objectives, and assessment strategies.

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on basic assessment and evaluation vocabulary and concepts used in schools, the distinction between student assessment and program evaluation, how to determine the quality and alignment of learning objectives, and how to assess learning outcomes to support program evaluation
  • Tools for communicating objectives and outcomes to all stakeholders, especially between educators and students
  • Insights on the function of community in the determination of quality

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Prerequisite learning
This institute is the second in a series of six. Completion of Planning for Quality 101 is highly recommended or

  • Clear understanding of aims, goals, and objectives mapping
  • Basic knowledge of logic model design and program evaluation
  • Articulated goals aligned to organizational mission, vision, and values

Schedule
This program will be offered twice:
Friday, October 27, 2017 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Literacenter
641 W. Lake St.

Friday, March 30, 2018 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Charles A. Hayes Center 4859 S. Wabash Ave.
Presenters

Presenters
Douglas G. Boughton, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University Kerry Freedman, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University

Register
October: http://bit.ly/102_Oct
March: http://bit.ly/102_March


PLANNING FOR QUALITY 103: Assessment Tools and Processes

Strong assessment practices are built from objectives that are authentic and appropriate to individual programs and students. Planning for Quality 103 will address methods for providing evidence of learning through student assessment.

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on rigorous assessment tools and the ways they can be tailored to individual types of activities such as a field trip or long-term residency
  • Tools for addressing assessment skepticism and distinguishing between formative and summative assessment strategies to identify and collect appropriate data through holistic and analytic rubrics
  • Tools for making qualitative judgments and subsequently quantifying those qualities
  • Insights from organizations that created and implemented successful assessment tools for a variety of different program types and purposes

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Prerequisite learning
This Institute is the third in a series of six. Completion of Planning for Quality 101 and 102 is highly recommended or

  • knowledge of basic assessment and evaluation vocabulary and concepts used in schools
  • an understanding of the difference between student assessment and program evaluation
  • experience in communicating objectives and outcomes to stakeholders

Schedule
This program will be offered twice:
Friday, November 17, 2017 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Friday, April 27, 2018 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Presenters
Douglas G. Boughton, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University
Kerry Freedman, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University

Register
November: http://bit.ly/103_Nov
April: http://bit.ly/103_April


IMPLEMENTING QUALITY 201: Performing Assessment

Creating assessment tools is one challenge, and preparing staff and teaching artists to use them is another. Implementing Quality 201 will focus on assessment implementation work plans and ways to teach artists and staff to use assessment and evaluation strategies.

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on the function of a rationale and how to use it with staff and artists to promote assessment in support of the creative process
  • Tools for navigating the relationship between creative risk-taking and assessment of learning in the arts
  • Insights from others on assessment strategies and the development of appropriate databases to facilitate access and communication by stakeholders

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Prerequisite Learning
This institute is the fourth in a series of six. Completion of Planning for Quality 101, 102, and 103 is highly recommended. Participants should have:

  • Current assessment tools for various program activities and types
  • Knowledge of, and experience with, holistic and analytic rubrics
  • Knowledge of how to quantify qualitative judgments Schedule

Schedule
This program will be offered twice:
Friday, November 17, 2017 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Friday, April 27, 2018 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Presenters
Douglas G. Boughton, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University
Kerry Freedman, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Education, Northern Illinois University

Register
November: http://bit.ly/201_Nov
April: http://bit.ly/201_April


IMPLEMENTING QUALITY 202: Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Visualization

Extracting data from assessment systems is the rst step in beginning to tell a story through data. Once data is collected, where does it go and how is it interpreted? What kinds of programs and technology can assist with data analysis? What do the data imply?

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on cost-effective data analysis programs and processes
  • Tools for visualizing and interpreting data
  • Insights from organizations that extract and analyze data in new and/or innovative ways

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Prerequisite learning
This institute is the fth in a series of six. Completion of Implementing Planning for Quality 101, 102, 103, and Implementing Quality 201 is highly recommended. Participants should have experience implementing assessment work plans with teaching artists and program staff, and experience using an assessment database to facilitate access and communication.

Schedule
This program will be offered twice:
Friday, December 15, 2017 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Friday, May 18, 2018 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Register
December: http://bit.ly/202_Dec
May: http://bit.ly/202_May


REFLECTING AND REVISING QUALITY 301: Telling Your Story through Data

The best data provides usable information that will be applied to program improvement and development. Does the impact narrative support the program’s logic model? How is impact communicated to di erent stakeholders?

This institute will provide the following:

  • Training on how to develop an impact narrative for stakeholders and present information that will provide the desired outcome such as funding, training, or other supports
  • Tools for creating an impact narrative that describes “the problem,” “the approach,” and “the impact”
  • Insights and examples of impact narratives and the outcomes of the successful communication of impact narratives on various organizational stakeholders

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Prerequisite learning
This institute is the sixth in a series of six. Completion of Implementing Planning for Quality 101, 102, 103 and Implementing Quality 201 and 202 is highly recommended. Participants should have experience extracting and analyzing data, practice in visualizing data, and experience making interpretations from data.

Schedule
This program will be offered twice:
Friday, December 15, 2017 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Friday, May 18, 2018 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Register
December: http://bit.ly/301_Dec
May: http://bit.ly/301_May


Data and Evaluation Track

This track of learning will guide you through Planning for Quality 101, 102, and 103; Implementing Quality 201 and 202; and Reflecting and Revising Quality 301 with the hands-on assistance and individualized coaching of a eld leader. You’ll work with a cohort of peers from other arts organizations who are wrestling with similar questions about why and how to use data to support program and organizational goals. In the process, you’ll work through your own case study and design an approach that helps you take the next steps in improving your ability to use data to tell your story. Participants who complete the full program will receive a certificate of completion.

Expectations

  • Commit to attend six courses: Planning for Quality 101, 102, and 103; Implementing Quality 201 and 202; Reflecting and Revising Quality 301, and the track orientation and culminating data slam
  • Meet and communicate with your assigned field leader monthly
  • Share your work with members of your cohort on a digital platform

Schedule
Data and Evaluation Track Orientation
Tuesday, March 27, 2018 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Quality 101 and 102
Friday, March 30, 2018 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Quality 103 and 201
Friday, April 27, 2018 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Quality 202 and 301
Friday, May 18, 2018 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Charles A. Hayes Center, 4859 S. Wabash Ave.

Culminating Data SLAM
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Literacenter, 641 W. Lake St.

Who should apply?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should apply.
To optimize learning, space is limited to 20 participants.

Apply
To be considered for the Data and Evaluation Track, applications must be submitted by Wednesday, February 28, 2018. Please visit http://bit.ly/Data_Eval_Track for more information and to apply.


Advocacy Institute

Ingenuity will host an advocacy institute using a tiered approach to learning. The morning session is targeted to individuals who are new to advocacy. The afternoon will examine each issue further and is targeted at individuals interested in legislative advocacy, telling your story, conducting a successful brie ng, and following up after advocacy meetings.

The morning session will provide the following:

  • Training on the spheres of in uence and where you and your organization fit
  • Training on issues that the arts are facing at the local, state, and federal levels
  • Topics may include municipal and state budgets, the CPS school quality rating, and maintaining momentum behind the Creative Schools Initiative

The afternoon session will provide the following:

  • Training on advocating to elected officials and appointed government officials such as aldermen, state legislators, or members of the school board
  • Tools and insights on how to tell your story, how to conduct a successful briefing, and how to follow up after advocacy meetings

Who should attend?
Executive directors, program staff, development staff, and teaching artists should attend.

Schedule
This program will be offered once:
Morning Session
Friday, October 20, 2017 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Marwen | 833 N. Orleans St.
Marwen Studios, 833 N. Orleans St.

Afternoon Session
Friday, October 20, 2017 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Marwen Studios, 833 N. Orleans St.

Register
Morning: http://bit.ly/Advocacy_AM
Afternoon: http://bit.ly/Advocacy_PM